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There is a fine line being protective and over protective of your child! Here are a few tips to let you as a parent know how it is ok not to be over protective of your little one!  1) Don't hold your child back because of your fears - From his first steps to his 
first date, your child will try many new things. His learning and attention issues 
might make these milestones harder for him to manage. But that doesn’t mean 
he shouldn’t have the chance to try. Instead of feeding any fears your child may have with your own, come up with plans to address them without holding your child back.  2) Acknowledge everyone’s anxiety - When your child heads to sleepaway camp or a playdate without your supervision, both of you may feel anxious. You may be tempted, on the one hand, to downplay his anxiety or your own. Or, on the other hand, you may want to have him stay home. Unlike either of these options, talking through your concerns together helps your child know that it’s OK to be anxious—but that it shouldn’t stop him. Discuss what each of you is anxious about.  3)Establish and stick to expectations - If your child is prone to tantrums or anger, it may seem easier to drop an issue than to enforce rules for good behavior. But establishing—and insisting on—everyday expectations for your child lets him know he’s accountable for his actions and that you believe he can behave appropriately. It also sets the stage for the rules that come with bigger responsibilities, like having a cell phone or learning to drive.  4)Let your child make mistakes - When your child is having trouble with friendships, facing issues at school or struggling in his first job, you may be tempted to jump in. Letting your child make mistakes and learn doesn’t mean you’re setting him up to fail. It means you’re setting him up to problem-solve on his own and learn the skill of self-awareness.  5) Give up the guilt - Many parents of kids with learning and attention issues 
feel guilty. That guilt can lead you to do more than you should for your child.  #skillmatics #skillbuilding #developskills #fun #games #education #learning 
#gifts #onlineshopping #moms #games #educationalgame
There is a fine line being protective and over protective of your child! Here are a few tips to let you as a parent know how it is ok not to be over protective of your little one! 1) Don't hold your child back because of your fears - From his first steps to his first date, your child will try many new things. His learning and attention issues might make these milestones harder for him to manage. But that doesn’t mean he shouldn’t have the chance to try. Instead of feeding any fears your child may have with your own, come up with plans to address them without holding your child back. 2) Acknowledge everyone’s anxiety - When your child heads to sleepaway camp or a playdate without your supervision, both of you may feel anxious. You may be tempted, on the one hand, to downplay his anxiety or your own. Or, on the other hand, you may want to have him stay home. Unlike either of these options, talking through your concerns together helps your child know that it’s OK to be anxious—but that it shouldn’t stop him. Discuss what each of you is anxious about. 3)Establish and stick to expectations - If your child is prone to tantrums or anger, it may seem easier to drop an issue than to enforce rules for good behavior. But establishing—and insisting on—everyday expectations for your child lets him know he’s accountable for his actions and that you believe he can behave appropriately. It also sets the stage for the rules that come with bigger responsibilities, like having a cell phone or learning to drive. 4)Let your child make mistakes - When your child is having trouble with friendships, facing issues at school or struggling in his first job, you may be tempted to jump in. Letting your child make mistakes and learn doesn’t mean you’re setting him up to fail. It means you’re setting him up to problem-solve on his own and learn the skill of self-awareness. 5) Give up the guilt - Many parents of kids with learning and attention issues feel guilty. That guilt can lead you to do more than you should for your child. #skillmatics #skillbuilding #developskills #fun #games #education #learning #gifts #onlineshopping #moms #games #educationalgame